Astronomers first recorded the pulsating lights at the South pole of Jupiter

A group of scientists from around the world conducted a joint observation of Jupiter in x-rays, when he noticed a mysterious pulsating glow near its South pole. Experts have suggested that the Northern lights to the southern and Northern hemispheres differ in brightness and degree of pulsation.

As shown by the image in the x-ray range, the brightness of both hemispheres is changing in different ways, while their pulsations are not correlated. All studies were conducted using Observatory XMM-Newton and Chandra X-Ray. Astronomers noted that the behavior of x-ray spots within the boundaries of the planet leads to the question what processes are responsible for the appearance of the Aurora.

Experts know that the phenomenon is formed through the contact of the ions of the solar wind with ions of sulfur and oxygen, and a source of the latter is the satellite of Jupiter. It remains unknown what specific role in the occurrence of x-ray radiation plays the satellite.



Astronomers first recorded the pulsating lights at the South pole of Jupiter 31.10.2017

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